An ad in time?

Spokane NAACP’s 99th Freedom Fund Banquet.

FOR THE LAST three years, I’ve donated the design for the local NAACP’s annual fundraising banquet souvenir booklet. The back story is that four years ago Marianne and I were invited to attend the banquet by a friend and former colleague at Sacred Heart. It was a sparkling gala, filled with Spokane’s movers and shakers, turned out in their finest.

The souvenir program, however, was so badly thrown together I felt embarrassed for the organizers and volunteered to design their future booklets. Reparations, I call it, and as such owe them a new design every year for, approximately, the next 500 years.

The organizers always insist I put in a small quarter-page ad for myself, although I have nothing of interest to advertise. Awkward. This year though, I think I got it right and wanted to share it with you.

As you may or may not know, the UN Council on Climate Change—a consortium of the world’s most distinguished climate scientists—recently released a report unequivically stating that humanity has twelve years left to seriously transition from fossil fuels or cross a tipping point into an irreversible climate cataclysm. Within decades of that, certainly less than a century, civilization will collapse and most, if not all, of humanity will die excruciating deaths along with most creatures living today.

Curiously, no one I know is talking about it. Seems we can’t be bothered. The few comments I hear on the media echo the denials of the oil barons and their amoral minions. It’s a strange alternate reality where even everyday evidence doesn’t matter (Hurricane Michael anyone?) and well-established, peer-reviewed, scientific facts and projections are considered too controversial to mention in social gatherings.

I’m sickened by the likelihood we will destroy this miracle of a living earth due to complacency, but I can’t stop it from happening. I do what I can to raise awareness—write letters, make calls, attend rallies, participate in 350.org activities—but have little impact, even among friends. I wonder sometimes why I bother. I have no children; when I die, I’m gone. For those with children and grandchildren, whose lives they would give their own for today, this apparent indifference to the unimaginable suffering they will endure in the future is beyond my comprehension.

So I made this little ad for the banquet program. Maybe it will help. Who knows?

Author: Bodhi Bill

BodhiBill.com is about sharing the songs I've been gifted with. Where did they come from? Two remarkable, life-changing events happened In 1996. First, I experienced an unexpected encounter with a friend of the family who was dying. The impact was so profound I left my career in advertising and became a board certified chaplain, working with the dying. Second, original songs began channeling through me with no warning. This was a complete surprise. Even though I'd played guitar since high school, I'd never considered myself a songwriter—or even a singer for that matter. More like a third-rate folk music plunker. But the songs came through anyway. Since I retired in 2015, I now have the time to record and share these songs. Although they are not "commercial" in style or content, I feel they are lovely little gems worth preserving and sharing.

2 thoughts on “An ad in time?”

  1. Love it Bill.
    It’s an image to which we can all relate.
    The message is gripping and clear!

    The “time to wake up” tag reminds me of Sam Harris’s excellent podcast, “Waking Up.”

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